Burger King Released 2 New Jalapeño Sandwiches — & They're Very Hot

Summer may almost be over, but Burger King wants to keep it hot, hot, hot. Added to their menu for a limited time are two new, spicy sandwiches: the jalapeño King sandwich and the spicy crispy jalapeño chicken sandwich.

Burger King kept the launch pretty low-key, with no official press release, but the items can be found on their menu online. They’re both described as having a layer of spicy jalapeños, a slice of pepper jack cheese and a smattering of creamy green chili aioli. 

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Image: Burger King.

The spicy crispy jalapeño chicken sandwich is made with 100 percent white meat and breaded with bold flavors and "just the right amount of heat," topped off with thick-cut smoked bacon. 

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Image: Burger King.

The jalapeño King sandwich, on the other hand, is a stack of two grilled beef patties, totaling more than a half-pound of beef. Be warned, though: This sandwich clocks in at nearly 1,000 calories (990 to be exact), so you might want to hold off on eating this until your cheat day. The chicken sandwich has 760 calories.

Worried the sandwiches won’t be hot enough? Rest assured, they apparently are. One YouTuber immediately began coughing after one bite. "But it’s very fresh," he adds. "The pepper jack cheese makes it even spicier."

This isn’t the first time Burger King toyed around with jalapeño-flavored items, though. In 2016, the chain tested jalapeño chicken fries, a spicy twist on their original chicken fries. If these two new sandwiches become popular enough, maybe we’ll see the jalapeño chicken fries return.

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Jenna Jameson Just Shared Exactly What She Eats On The Keto Diet

Starting a diet is the easy part—but figuring out what to eat day-to-day is freaking tough.

Now Jenna Jameson (a.k.a. keto kween), is doing her fans a solid by sharing her daily meals and snacks. “I get a lot of messages asking me what I eat in a day to stay in ketosis,” she wrote in a new Instagram post, showing another stunning before-and-after photo. (P.S.: Jenna says she was not pregnant in that before pic.)

Let’s talk menu. I get a lot of messages asking me what I eat in a day to stay in ketosis. Well, it’s underwhelming. I am one of those odd people that doesn’t need variety. Every morning I eat the exact same thing. 3 eggs with cheese and an avocado. Lunch is my biggest meal, I always eat arugula salad, grilled asparagus or zucchini with some kind of meat (usually a hamburger patty or grilled chicken) I then snack when ever I feel hungry (usually on almonds or macadamia nuts… sometime cottage cheese) that’s it! Then I begin my fast at 6 pm. I drink lots of water until I go to sleep at around 10 pm. I drink coffee at 8 am and I end my fast at 11 am. That’s it! No magic, no fancy diet… just clean whole organic foods. I waved bye bye to anything processed or packaged a long time ago. This is 60 lbs gone my friend. It can be done! I’m always asked how I have the will power… well when you see results like this in 4 months, it powers you!!!! Let me know your results and questions! #keto #weightlossjourney #weightlosstransformation #weightloss #fitmom #beforeandafter #ketodiet #transformation *i wasn’t pregnant in the before pic😖

A post shared by Jenna Jameson (@jennacantlose) on

Let’s talk menu. I get a lot of messages asking me what I eat in a day to stay in ketosis. Well, it’s underwhelming. I am one of those odd people that doesn’t need variety. Every morning I eat the exact same thing. 3 eggs with cheese and an avocado. Lunch is my biggest meal, I always eat arugula salad, grilled asparagus or zucchini with some kind of meat (usually a hamburger patty or grilled chicken) I then snack when ever I feel hungry (usually on almonds or macadamia nuts… sometime cottage cheese) that’s it! Then I begin my fast at 6 pm. I drink lots of water until I go to sleep at around 10 pm. I drink coffee at 8 am and I end my fast at 11 am. That’s it! No magic, no fancy diet… just clean whole organic foods. I waved bye bye to anything processed or packaged a long time ago. This is 60 lbs gone my friend. It can be done! I’m always asked how I have the will power… well when you see results like this in 4 months, it powers you!!!! Let me know your results and questions! #keto #weightlossjourney #weightlosstransformation #weightloss #fitmom #beforeandafter #ketodiet #transformation *i wasn’t pregnant in the before pic😖

A post shared by Jenna Jameson (@jennacantlose) on

According to Jenna, 44, her keto diet meal plan is…pretty boring. “I am one of those odd people that doesn’t need variety,” she wrote.

Jenna says she eats “the exact same thing” every morning, which includes three eggs with cheese and avocado, which, TBH, sounds like the perfect breakfast.

“Lunch is my biggest meal,” she continued. “I always eat arugula salad, grilled asparagus or zucchini with some kind of meat (usually a hamburger patty or grilled chicken).”

Jenna says she snacks on almonds, macadamia nuts, or cottage cheese whenever she feels hungry before starting her intermittent fasting at 6 p.m. Then, she drinks “lots of water” until she goes to bed around 10 p.m.

In the morning, she has coffee around 8 a.m. and ends her fast around 11 a.m. “That’s it! No magic, no fancy diet… just clean, whole organic foods,” she said. “I waved bye bye to anything processed or packaged a long time ago.”

Clearly, it’s working for Jenna. “This is 60 lbs gone my friend. It can be done! I’m always asked how I have the will power… well when you see results like this in 4 months, it powers you!!!!”

Jenna has been loving on keto on Instagram for months. In late July, she revealed that she lost 57 pounds on the diet, and in early August she shared on Instagram that she’s at the lowest weight she’s been in four years.

She’s been very clear that it’s not all about numbers, though. Jenna said late last week that she’s finally “getting her groove back.”—and she posted a pic of herself in white pants to prove it.

So uh, who’s gonna run to the store and stock up on eggs, cheese, and avocados with me?

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26 Cult Favorite Items From Whole Foods Only True Fans Know To Buy

It’s no secret that Whole Foods is a place where dreams come true (… especially for Amazon Prime members now). Here are some absolute cult favorites from the most heavenly of grocery stores.

Whole Foods has been big on cage-free produce for more than a decade, but they’ve since widened that to add other qualifications; their 365 Everyday Value eggs are pasture-raised, too.

Whole Foods

There’s not much the store doesn’t have in terms of non-dairy milk alternatives. Their wide selection of almond milks, in particular, is super popular.

Whole Foods

Have you had these delightful crunchy chickpea morsels? Do you know what it’s like to be ALIVE?

Whole Foods

THERE 👏 ARE 👏 SO 👏 MANY 👏 AND 👏 THEY 👏 ARE 👏 ALL 👏 SO 👏 PURE 👏 AND 👏 GOOD.

Whole Foods

When you consider the fact that these nuts have 70 percent less sugar than traditional chocolate-covered almonds, you can almost convince yourself they’re a health food.

Whole Foods

Not only is there just about every flavor of cereal (or a 365 version of them), but they’re just much cheaper than they typically are at other stores.

Whole Foods

A super niche product, but one that certain people would die for. Whole Foods has been on the ghee beat for awhile now.

Whole Foods

Again, there are about a million peanut butter brands at Whole Foods, but their 365 Everyday Products peanut butter is (1) healthy, and (2) tastes luxuriously good. Justin’s gets an honorable mention, though. Hi @Justin, ilu.

Whole Foods

Quite honestly the most delicious snack dessert to ever exist.

goodsoap.com

Goodsoap, in particular, is an all-time Whole Foods fav.

Whole Foods

Another house line that’s 100 percent worth buying. Their frozen fruit selection is A+ and makes a million lives easier every day, just about.

Whole Foods

Delicious, nutritious, and exclusive to Whole Foods.

Whole Foods

While you’re picking up coconut oil, don’t forget to grab these sweet ‘n’ salty delights. But you already knew to do that!

Harmless Harvest

Aaand while you’re juggling your coconut oil and your coconut chips, you might wanna pick up some of this good stuff too.

Whole Foods

D.E.L.I.C.I.O.U.S.

Getty ImagesROBYN BECK

Are you even human if you walk through a Whole Foods bread and pastry section and don’t buy … all of it?

Getty ImagesBrooks Kraft

Both the salad bar and hot bars are so fresh and fancy, it’s easy to get carried away. Whole Foods experts know to take advantage of the scales the store puts all around those areas and how to best hack it so their lunch is closer to $7 than $17.

Whole Foods

Though there are plenty of rice options at Whole Foods, people swear by the texture and natural sweetness of this brand’s product specifically.

Whole Foods

The store’s nuts, spices, powders, and snacks are easily accessible and allow for relatively cheap bulk buying, considering what you’re getting. This from a girl who once went on a month-long goji-berry-on-everything kick … and spent about $20 in the process.

Whole Foods

Those who love fall-flavored things know the 365 pumpkin spice yogurt is the only acceptable way to get that pumpkin flare into your breakfast.

Whole Foods

A lot of people love ’em. End of story.

Whole Foods

The day they came to Whole Foods, the world was forever changed.

Whole Foods

Sure, Whole Foods carries every flavor of La Croix under the sun, but they also have 365 versions in competing flavors that they sell slightly cheaper. A seltzer lover’s paradise.

Whole Foods

These aren’t exclusive to Whole Foods, but damn it, do they know how to strategically place a cute little snacking cheese near the absolute essential cheeses you specifically came for or what?

Whole Foods

Yes, they’re basically Oreos. Yes, they’re fuh-reaking delicious.

Whole Foods

If you know, you know.

From: Delish

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A Back-to-School Grocery List & Menu so You Don’t Have to Worry About Meals All Week

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You have enough on your plate (pun intended) without stressing over what you’re going to feed your family during that first week of back-to-school madness. School supplies, new clothes, new schedules, meet-the-teacher nights — with so much to wrap your brain around, the last thing you want to do is spend hours meal planning or roaming around the grocery store. 

Of course, such is mom life, right? You’re going to need to have a meal plan in place heading into that first week because you want to send your kids off the school with full bellies (aka brain fuel). Not to mention they’ll be ravenous when they come home each afternoon. As soon as they sling off their backpacks, they’ll be wondering what’s for dinner.

So, let us make things a little easier for you, Mama. We’ve put together an easy and crowd-pleasing back-to-school menu for that first harrowing week. Bonus? You’ll also find a grocery list outlining all the items you’ll need to make your meals. 

1
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Monday Breakfast


1/11
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Monday Breakfast

2
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Monday Dinner


2/11
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Monday Dinner

3
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Tuesday Breakfast


3/11
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Tuesday Breakfast

4
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Tuesday Dinner


4/11
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Tuesday Dinner

5
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Wednesday Breakfast


5/11
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Wednesday Breakfast

6
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Wednesday Dinner


6/11
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Wednesday Dinner

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Thursday Breakfast


7/11
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Thursday Breakfast

8
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Thursday Dinner


8/11
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Thursday Dinner

9
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Friday Breakfast


9/11
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Friday Breakfast

10
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Friday Dinner


10/11
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Friday Dinner

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Your Grocery List


11/11
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Your Grocery List

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Ina Garten Has a Sweet Corn Hack You Need to See

Your girl Ina Garten is back with a cool new hack. This time, it involves corn and a kitchen towel.

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Image: Giphy.

Food Network’s Garten tweeted a video of herself looking genuinely enthused to show us just how to cut corn kernels off the cob without getting it all over your kitchen and kitchen counters. And it works! Well, kind of.

It’s simple, really: Place a clean towel down on your counter, grab an extra-sharp knife, and cut the kernels straight off the cob over the towel, which should collect all the kernels. Then, pour them from the towel right into a bowl. Bada-bing, bada-boom.

But the best part? Garten still manages to get kernels on the counter! 

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Image: Inagarten/Twitter.

We still love you, Ina.

Commenters were quick to share their own tips, and we have to say, using a large bowl is also a fantastic option. 

Or, you can use a Bundt pan. 

And as Renee suggests, use a tub pan for creamed corn.

You might notice Garten uses the hashtag #CookLikeAPro, and for good reason: It’s clearly tied to her forthcoming cookbook, Cook Like a Pro. Not only will she have plenty of new recipes for you to try when the cookbook releases on Oct. 23, but she’s also arming you with the know-how and hacks to cook like one too. Isn’t she the best? 

In the midst of promoting said cookbook, Garten is also hard at work helping to fight childhood hunger. She recently teamed up with Williams-Sonoma, designing an exclusive spatula. Proceeds from spatulas sold will go straight to No Kid Hungry.

All hail the cooking queen.

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Holla! Starbucks Is Giving Away Free Cold Brew And Other Iced Drinks Today!!

Summertime is all about sangria, rosé, iced coffee, and iced tea. And Starbucks has answered our calls for all-things chilled with free iced beverages for today only.

As Thrillist reports, as part of Starbucks’ popular Happy Hour deal, the coffee chain is offering a buy one, get one free deal on iced drinks. The deal is only available on Thursday, August 16, and it includes cold drinks like iced espresso drinks, cold brew, Starbucks Refreshers, iced tea, and iced coffee — but not Frappucinos.

It’s hot. Cold brew crew to the rescue! 💪 #ColdBrew ☁️#ColdFoamColdBrew ✨#VanillaSweetCreamColdBrew

A post shared by Starbucks Coffee ☕ (@starbucks) on

The deal is available after 3 p.m., making it the perfect solution to that mid-afternoon slump. Additionally, the two drinks don’t have to be the same, so you can get two different drinks for your BOGO deal if your heart desires, or share with a friend who doesn’t share your love of cold brew.

To cash in on the Happy Hour, all you need to do is sign up for Starbucks Rewards and show your barista the promo code for the Happy Hour when you order, or apply it on your app when you order ahead.

And if you’re totally over summer and all you want is a Pumpkin Spice Latte, you won’t have to wait much longer. Business Insider claims that all things pumpkin spice are due to return at Starbucks on August 28.

From: Delish

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Step Up Your Smoothie Game With This Blender For Under $10

Good morning! It’s time for the most important meal of the day. And, in your case, the most important drink of the day as well. Whether you’re a smoothie or a protein shake kind of guy is up to you, but no matter what you’re making, you want to make sure you have the very best. Like we said, it’s the most important meal and all.

Don’t have the room in your kitchen? Or prefer to save a little money by skipping out on an upgrade? Either way, there’s an answer and it’s shockingly simple.

Right now, Walmart is offering the Chefman Ultimate Personal Smoothie Blender for $9.99. And because it’s ~*personal*~ you know it’s the perfect size for concocting your own morning drinks without taking up too much space.

Typically, the Chefman blender is around $15 more expensive, according to DealNews.com, which makes the current deal its most affordable price yet.

The blender, which is on sale while supplies last, comes in two colors and also comes with two detachable 16 ounce travel cups. In a hurry? Mix, blend, and grab.

You won’t have to worry about being held back to avoid chunks in your drink. The blender is prepped with a 240 watt motor to ensure that drinks are, to quote Santana and Rob Thomas, so smooth.

If you need a little reassurance, Walmart offers two-year and three-year warranties for $2 and $3 respectively. And just in case you’d like to save on shipping, you can always pick one up in stores.

However you get it, reviewers say it’s worth it, especially for the price, so looks like the most important meal of the day just got even better.




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Is The Raw Food Diet Ever A Good Idea? Experts Weigh In

I get it. Meal prep is a huge pain in the ass. And honestly, literally, no one is ever in the mood to cook a huge dinner at the end of a long day at work. 

Which is why a diet that involves zero cooking has obvious appeal. No ovens or stoves, you say? That’s what the raw food diet is essentially—no foods that were cooked on high heat.

But before you dive into the crudité, there are some pretty key things you should know about this majorly-hyped diet.

OKAY, I’LL BITE: WHAT IS THE RAW FOOD DIET?

In a nutshell, the raw food diet is essentially a modified vegan diet that limits you to foods cooked below 116 to 118 degrees Fahrenheit. Instead, you can juice, puree, soak, or sprout your meals.

“The raw food diet is based on the idea that the natural enzymes in raw foods are destroyed through the cooking process,” says Abbey Sharp, a Toronto-based dietitian and blogger at Abbey’s Kitchen. In theory, heat does indeed destroy many enzymes in food—i.e., chemicals that help us to digest and absorb our meals—along with some vitamins and phytonutrients.

Nutritionists, however, say that’s an oversimplification. “Most of the enzymes in food are destroyed in the gut with stomach acid anyway,” says Sharp. What’s more, our bodies make digestive enzymes that have the same effect as the ones found in foods, explains Robin Fourutan, R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

WHERE DID IT COME FROM?

The raw food diet has been around since at least the late 1800s, according to the New York Academy of Medicine, when Swiss nutritionist and physician Maximilian Bircher-Benner advocated for it. His book, The Prevention of Incurable Disease, recommended eating 50 per cent raw veggies, fruits, seeds, and nuts, and the rest “conservatively cooked” veggies, eggs, meats, and whole grain breads.

More recently, the diet got a boost when Gisele and Tom Brady’s chef told Boston.com they followed it.

WHAT EXACTLY CAN YOU EAT ON THE RAW FOOD DIET?

Foods that get the green light on the raw food diet include raw fruits, veggies, legumes, and grains; seeds and nuts; extra-virgin olive oil; and raw coconut oil and butter, says Sharp. Some people even eat unpasteurized milk, cheese, and honey, as well as raw fish and meats.

Anything that is cooked or heated above 118 degrees, as mentioned before, is strictly off-limits. That means you have to avoid most stuff that’s heated in your oven or microwave as well as all processed foods. A few not-so-intuitive foods that are off the menu include table salt, pasta, and pasteurised juice (since pasteurisation involves heating foods to kill bacteria).

ARE THERE ANY BENEFITS TO A RAW FOOD DIET?

The main benefit of the raw food diet is that it cuts down on processed foods and gets you eating way more fruits and veggies that are rich in disease-fighting antioxidants and phytonutrients. “Getting more plant foods in your diet can help reduce the risk of any condition linked to inflammation,” says Fouroutan, including cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

Getting more greens works wonders for your cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well, says Sharp, lowering your risk of heart disease.

ARE THERE ANY DOWNSIDES TO EATING THIS WAY?

Plenty, say nutritionists. For one, “the theory that all raw food is more nutritious than cooked is really just a myth,” says Sharp.

It’s true that heat does break down some antioxidants like vitamin C, she says. But other nutrients, phytochemicals, and antioxidants, including lycopene, potassium, and zinc—found in foods like tomatoes, mushrooms, and asparagus—actually get a boost from cooking.

All that restriction also puts you at greater risk of nutrient deficiency. “It’s difficult to maintain a 100 per cent raw food diet and get all of the nutrients you need,” says Fourutan. Missing out on meat, dairy, and fish cuts back on healthy protein sources and fats like omega-3 fatty acids, as well as vitamins like B12, calcium, iron, zinc, selenium, and vitamin D. And if you skip beans and grains—which are tastier when cooked—you’ll also miss out on good sources of fiber, notes Sharp.

Bloating and gas are another unpleasant side effect of the raw food diet. “A lot of raw vegetables are rich in insoluble fibres that we don’t digest, which get fermented in the gut by bacteria, causing gas. Cooking helps to soften those fibres,” says Sharp. “People with IBS especially may find that a raw diet is particularly hard on their gut and causes digestive distress.”

Adding uncooked animal foods to your diet can even be dangerous. “There’s a reason why Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization: so we don’t get sick,” says Sharp. Unpasteurized dairy can carry Listeria, while raw meat and eggs can carry other food-borne pathogens that are especially risky if you’re pregnant or have a compromised immune system.

SHOULD YOU TRY THE RAW FOOD DIET?

Given all of the potential downsides of a strict raw food diet, it’s not backed by many nutritionists. “We have healthy cooking methods for a reason,” says Sharp.

With that said, the raw food diet doesn’t have to be all-or-nothing. “As long as your digestion can handle it, including raw fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, and fermented foods is really healthy without committing to a 100-per cent raw vegan diet,” says Fourutan.

Keep in mind that some cooking methods are better than others for preserving the nutrients in plant foods. “Boiling any veggie diminishes the nutrients because they leech into the water,” explains Fourutan. Instead, lightly steam or sauté—especially notoriously gassy cruciferous veggies like broccoli and Brussels sprouts, which are easier on your digestive system when they’re cooked.

The bottom line: Eating raw fruits and veggies is always a good thing. But they shouldn’t be the only thing you eat—otherwise, you risk nutrient deficiencies and other health problems. The stove, oven, and microwave really are your friends

This article originally appeared on Women’s Health US.

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This Food Is A Game-Changer For Weight Loss And You're Probably Not Getting Enough Of It

Think fibre has all the sex appeal of thermals 
and Crocs? You’d be right. But with benefits 
that prove this F-word is a health powerhouse, 
it’s certainly getting experts hot and bothered…

Foods can possess a certain, well, sexiness. Some have it in spades (chocolate, berries… Oh, avocado, you fox), while others are forever destined to sit on a spare plate just outside the Instagram shot.

Roughage. Bulk. Fibre is many things, but culinary porn it is not. Perhaps that’s why, despite the relative ease of doing so, the vast majority of us fall short of getting our fill. But, despite fibre’s bland rep, this classic’s getting a makeover.

“Fibre is number one on the radar of nutrition professionals right now,” says registered nutritionist Jennie Gough. “Many women don’t realise the importance of including more fibre in their diet. This is concerning because [fibre] has significant benefits for health and wellbeing.”

It’s estimated that the average person is eating around 20g a day, despite the Dietitians Association of Australia recommending 25–30g. That said, nutrition evangelists are going nuts for the stuff. Scientists are travelling the world to research the effects of fibre on the body, while 2017 research by Nutrition Research Australia suggests if we all added just one serve of high-fibre grain food to our diets daily, it could help prevent 64,000 cases of cardiovascular disease and 126,000 cases of type 2 diabetes a year.

The incredible bulk

Think you’ve got fibre sussed? Doubtful – it’s a complex little number with more layers than a serving of Viennetta. “The term ‘fibre’ describes the non-digestible plant-based carbs in your diet,” says consultant colorectal surgeon Simon Bach. “There are different forms of carbs – starch, which is long chains of glucose; and non-starch polysaccharides, which are long chains of other sugars (non-glucose). It is these non-starch polysaccharides that make up the fibre in your diet.

But the way we refer to fibre has changed as understanding of the human body has developed. For decades, health professionals spoke of soluble fibre (which dissolves to form a liquid carried through the gut wall into the body) and insoluble fibre (which remains in your bowels, increasing the bulk and softness of your waste). More recently, though, experts have phased out these terms because of inconsistencies in the ways the types of fibre react in the body. Now, both sit under the umbrella term of ‘dietary fibre’.

Still with us? The fibre passed into the large intestine intact is processed by the microbiome in the gut. These bacteria break down the fibre and use the resulting carbs as energy, but they also pump out short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as a by-product.

Your bit of rough

It’s this last stage of the process, the goings-on in the gut, that’s getting researchers’ rocks off. “We’re learning more about the knock-on benefits that come from maintaining the health of the gut lining,” says Professor Gary Frost, chair of nutrition and dietetics at Imperial College London. “And, because of the role that it plays in this, the importance of fibre, too.”

Back to those SCFAs. A growing body of research is pointing to their disease-fighting anti-inflammatory properties as the reason fibre is so good at future-proofing your health. In the past year, studies have highlighted the role of fibre in (ready?) building stronger bones, protecting bowel health, reducing risk of osteoarthritis and lowering cholesterol. And you can add to that older research into fibre’s role in breast cancer prevention and strengthening immunity.

Future-proofing aside, eating more fibre could also benefit your immediate health. It comes down to the role fibre plays in weight loss. Studies have pointed to the principle that fibre absorbs more water and breaks down at a slower rate than other nutrients, keeping blood sugar levels steady and you feeling fuller for longer. Those SCFAs have a part to play, too, by encouraging specific cells to release appetite-suppressing hormones, such as peptide YY.

It’s not all bran

While you’re probably well versed on what constitutes a carb, fibre is a bit foggier. “High-fibre foods are those that contain at least 6g fibre per 100g, while those that contain at least 3g are a ‘source’ of fibre,” explains registered dietitian Nichola Ludlam-Raine.

Remember, you’re aiming for 25–30g a day. So, how can you up your intake? Ludlam-Raine suggests adding handfuls of frozen veg to meals, swapping chips for nuts, seeds and popcorn, and using wholemeal flour in your baking. And if you’re peeling all your veg, take note. “Fibre is found in the cell wall, where it provides structural support for the plant,” says Gough. “The peel is a rich source of fibre so, by eating fruit and veg with the skin on, you’ll get more of the benefits. When it comes to drinks, juicing removes more fibre than blending, but with smoothies it’s still broken down, so has less benefit than if you were simply to eat the whole fruit.”

Before you make a pit stop at the farmers’ market, listen up. “Going from no fibre at all to a lot of fibre could put a strain on your digestive system,” warns Ludlam-Raine. This could lead to a blockage situation or, at the other end of the spectrum, you know, the shits. To swerve such issues, increase the amount of fibre in your diet gradually, while upping your fluid intake at the same time. And if your gut has a low tolerance for, well, anything, consult a dietitian as to the best sources of fibre for you. “Certain fibre-containing foods can trigger symptoms of IBS,” says Gough. “For sufferers, I would suggest spreading fibre across your meals and focusing on foods like oatmeal, barley and fruits, including berries, mangoes and oranges, which should be better tolerated.”

If you can handle fibre-rich foods, experts say diversity is key. Study after study points to the health benefits of a diverse microbiome, so, next time you’re browsing the supermarket, go with your gut. 

This article originally appeared in the August issue of Women’s Health

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Your Complete Guide to Caring for a Cast-Iron Pan

There’s a reason people wax poetic about the magic of their grandparents’ cast-iron skillet. Unlike other pans, cast iron just seems to get better over time, layers and layers of seasoning building up until everything from pork chops to skillet cobbler cooks up in it like a dream. But caring for your favorite pan can be confusing. There’s a lot of information out there that can honestly make having a cast-iron skillet seem like more trouble than it’s worth, but we promise you it’s not hard at all. Use this guide, and you’ll be serving up perfectly seared steaks and cheesy skillet potatoes in no time.

1. How to pick a cast-iron pan

Cast iron is extremely resilient. If you’re buying vintage cast iron, look for a pan that doesn’t have any pitting or gouges in the surface of the metal. If the pan is rusted, you’ll need to get the rust off (either by scrubbing it with coarse salt or gently using steel wool) and reseason it. Any new cast-iron pan is fine, but be aware that even a pan that claims to be preseasoned will need to be properly seasoned at home.

2. How to season your cast-iron pan

When you season your cast-iron pan, a special magic happens. The magic of… chemistry! When the oil you slick over the cast iron’s surface is heated, it polymerizes, meaning that the oil actually bonds with the surface of the metal rather than just sitting above it. This is what creates the durable "seasoning" layer that makes cast iron so resilient and mostly nonstick — not as nonstick as Teflon, but nonstick enough that as long as your pan is well-seasoned and preheated, you should be able to cook almost anything in it.

Seasoning your pan is simple. Heat it up on the stove over high heat. Then, swipe it with a layer of neutral oil (think canola, not olive), and let it cool down. Repeat this process two to three times, and your pan should be seasoned to perfection. You should do this seasoning step once after every time you use your pan.

To keep building up the seasoning, try making bacon or frying up some of your favorite foods the first few times you use your pan. This will help continue to build the nonstick layer, which will save you from heartache down the road.

3. How to wash your cast-iron pans

Don’t soak your pan in the sink. Wait until the pan is warm enough to handle, and wash it then. You can use mild dish soap on your pan (again, since the seasoning is actually polymerized and not a surface oil, it should be fine after coming into contact with soap), but if you want to be really safe, just use warm water and a gentle scrub sponge or stiff dishwashing brush. Wipe the pan dry as soon as you’re done cleaning it and reseason.

4. Getting rid of stubborn stains

If you have a really stubborn, stuck-on stain on your pan, there are two things you can do. First, boil some water in the pan. This should loosen and soften the stuck-on food. Once the pan is warm enough to handle safely, scrub it with a stiff dishwashing brush. Empty the pan, sprinkle in some coarse kosher salt, and use your brush to continue scrubbing (the salt acts as a gentle abrasive). You can use a steel wool pad as a last resort, but it may damage the seasoning. When the pan is clean, wipe it dry and reseason it.

5. How to store your pan

Make sure your pan is absolutely dry before you store it — this will help prevent rusting. Then, store it in a cool, dry cupboard.

Now you know how to take care of your cast-iron pan! Once you build up a good layer of seasoning, you can make all manner of things in it… yes, even eggs (get the pan hot first though!).

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